Borough Market, London

Here’s photos of Borough Market, London.

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As you approach Borough Market, you will be greeted by this iconic architecture, and where the fun and discovery begins.
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Visitors at Borough Market standing around chowing down after buying their food
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Borough Market has a huge selection of awesome tasting food products
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The diversity in culture of London means Borough Market is a food haven and we had a fun time trying out food from all over the world.
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Borough Market store owners are very much involved in their food production and knows intimately the produce they sell, which means we learnt a lot as well.
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There’s always a large crowd at Borough Market, but everyone enjoys themselves and the atmosphere is great.
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Street Side Oysters at Borough Market with Tutor Yuet Ling, edukate Singapore.
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Next to Borough Market you find stores and pubs that provides everything else that you seek to buy.
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Friends and family have a great time getting their Sunday’s worth of catch up
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Also makes a great place to wait for your friend’s to come by at Borough Market
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Borough Market caters to everyone’s needs and people come from all over the world to visit this famous landmark.
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Happiness, Borough Market.
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Here’s a vegetable stall and passer’s by at Borough Market

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Borough Market caters to everyone’s needs and people come from all over the world to visit this famous landmark.
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Try every type of oysters and you will get to taste the distinct differences that is on offer
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They shuck oysters fresh behind and serve you perfect at Borough Market
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Local British produce at Borough Market, and tomatoes for a traditional English Breakfast
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Borough Market makes a great place for the surrounding businesses to meet up
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Yes they saw us holding a huge camera pointing their way, Borough Market
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and they are fine with that, Borough Market
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Tutor Yuet Ling at Borough Market, London. Oysters at the street side.
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Its just hitting winter but that doesn’t stop Londoners enjoying a drink outside Borough Market.
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Borough Market is close to a lot of businesses and turns into a busy thoroughfare
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Lots of things to see and do at Borough Market
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And sometimes too bustling when its lunch time
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Tired, Borough Market
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Borough Market, alone.
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Borough Market, with friends.
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Borough Market where there’s just tables alongside and welcoming to anyone who wishes to stand around with their purchases
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Londoners at Borough Market
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Borough Market thoroughfare
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Lay a bet that he’s got a nice lunch in there, Borough Market.
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A pint, British, and friends. Borough Market
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Iconic Borough Market architecture welcoming its guests,
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Walking around with food in tow, bliss. Borough Market

The importance of education and scoring well in PSLE and GCE O’ levels A* and A1, SG50

Tips, Hints, and Focus for the PSLE Examinations.

SEAB MOE Syllabus PSLE and GCE O’ levels Singapore for Primary and Secondary Schools is by far the main contributor to the social mobility of Singaporeans.

PSLE Student doing Mathematics MOE SEAB Syllabus Singapore in Tampines Tuition Centre Class
PSLE Student doing Mathematics MOE SEAB Syllabus Singapore in Tampines Tuition Centre Class

It is the first major exam that starts the path of development for a young individual by training, developing and constructing the psyche of the ultimate student and turning them into a complete Singaporean adult that is capable of competing in this 21st Century workforce.

With SG50, we have now witnessed the effectiveness of education in transforming us into a metropolitan first world country, one that only has human resource that drives this country.

We survived, and then thrived against all odds, whilst in the face of competition against many other resource-rich nations. All this did not come from just plain luck.

We have witnessed too, with the PSLE and streaming of students into secondary schools, how much their PSLE scores alter their outcomes when they grow up.

And I am sure we have to keep our education world class in years to come, even more so with the huge external forces from other markets within the burgeoning Asian region as well as pressures from the international market to keep up-to-date and solve every problem that we will face in the future.

We cannot be naive and think our problems can be solved with a normal, mediocre education, with a low-skilled and highly unmotivated work force. That is not the mark of a first world country. We need to have something special to keep competition at bay.

Dynamism is a highly valued characteristic our children should possess.

I shall loosely quote Gordon Ramsay, “You can’t run a “country” if you can’t even run your own bath.”

And hence, education, training, intelligence, creativity, innovation and persevering hardwork are the hallmarks of a successful country. We need to adopt the mentality that we are larger than what we are, that our world is not restricted to the red dot that makes Singapore a country. But rather, we are in a global community that requires global competitiveness and social skills. And that comes from a world class education.

We need a large canvas of intelligence and expertise, multitudes of captains of industries, pools of talents, and scores of highly skilled individuals to deal with the increasingly convoluted society and economy of the future. And that comes from a world class education.

We, as a nation, bear witness to social mobility, from our previous generations to current generations, and am sure, to our future generations, that doing well in education equates to better salaries, better standards of living and a stable economy. But this didn’t just happen to an individual, and the last 50 years, we have all moved up the social ladder as a collective community. And we have continued to be socially mobile. And that again, comes from a world class education.

As a nation, we have improved leaps and bounds, again, that didn’t just happen by plain luck. We have our PM Lee Kuan Yew to thank for that. But even more so, our society as a whole has taken those steps to rid ourselves of the third world status and decided that this should be the way to go, forwards. And that should always be the way to go, forwards.

All this leads to one conclusion, that of a student that does well in his/her education, will do well in life. That is a rule of thumb of any Singaporean student, and its the easiest and distinct way by far to move up the ladder and achieve success in life.

Let not detractors say that PSLE is getting too hard, for being soft only weakens our pool of talented future human resources. For in Singapore, strength comes from advancing together, and we have to be careful when a minority wants to re-invent the wheel and begs for an easy PSLE.

Let me quote some articles statistics that shows our education is working:

Forbes.com: Why Asian Nations Dominate Global Education Rankings-Not surprisingly, the top four countries overall – South Korea (No. 1), Japan (No. 2), Singapore (No. 3)….put an emphasis on their students developing basic skills….numeracy and literacy.

Straits Times: “Singapore takes third spot in global education rankings

Wikipedia.org: “Singapore’s education system has been described as “world-leading” and in 2010 was among those picked out for commendation by the former British Tory education secretary Michael Gove…As of 2012, both universities are ranked among the Top 50 in the world.”

Insing.com: Education minister pleased with Singapore’s PISA ranking “To do well, a student can’t get by with just memorisation; he must have real knowledge and the wits to apply that knowledge to unpredictable real-life problems. This is exactly what we want our students to learn in school — the real skills to think critically and creatively so they can succeed in the 21st Century,” said Heng Swee Kiat.

We do need changes to adapt to the ever changing world, and so our education shall be tweaked to allow such changes. But changing the whole system, on something that has worked well, is just suicidal and cataclysmic.

The problem with education is that the effects are not seen straight off, and only in 20 years time, and maybe another 5-10 years after that when the student graduates and starts climbing up their career and contributes to society. Only then will we feel the effect that will be shouldered by the next generation with a wrong education model.

We have come far from where we began 50 years ago, and our success has come from truly hard intelligent pragmatic work. The recipe for success did not come from being weak, or having a compromised education/society. We do have to be careful how any changes will alter our state, as if its for the better, no one complains; but for the worse, everyone pays, ultimately.

Generally, and critically, the higher the education of a Singaporean, the higher they climb up the social ladder. And that is fact. And that starts with the PSLE. And that, is one that parents should never waver in their child’s education.

Punggol Small Group Tuition English Mathematics and Science
Punggol Female Tutors attending to Primary students when they find it difficult to understand. Explain when they need it, or if we find they can do it, we will make them think independently

MOE 2015 syllabus- developing a 21st Century Singaporean child (Part 2)

This is eduKate Singapore Tuition Centre’s Child Development Technology for our English, Maths and Science tutorial classes for primary and secondary tutorial classes.

In line with the MOE’s 2015 English Syllabus, we have been developing new structures to teach students to develop them into 21st Century individuals that are gregarious, intelligent and exceptional.

Below is a list that we keep in mind when we teach our students, and also for all parents that are looking to teach a child to be a successful Singaporean in the 21st Century.

Interpersonal Skills

To Interact, Being a Leader and Team Player gets the work done.

  • culturally aware of multi cultural Singapore
  • sensitive to society/political correctness
  • integrate with society
  • take responsibility
  • acknowledge one’s mistakes
  • ability to solve problems of all kinds
  • participate in a team as team member
  • conduct meetings
  • commitment to a promise
  • loyalty to family, friends, company and country
  • form a team and engage effectively
  • be a leader, motivate and give instructions
  • give/receive/appreciate criticism
  • manage time, objectives and resources
  •  negotiate and persuade effectively
  • compromise and agree on best options
  • speak clearly, concisely and logically

Idioms for PSLE Syllabus-eduKate Tuition Centre

Top 10 Idioms for PSLE English Syllabus, Singapore-eduKate Teaching Materials.

Idioms can add spice onto the canvas of your composition writing and when appropriately used, gives a dramatic effect and shows the mastery that you have attained.  The idea here, while attempting PSLE, is to have a list of go-to tools that would cover almost every situation that you can come across. This helps pepper your composition, adding flavour and widen the spectrum of colour to your writing.

idiom-ˈɪdɪəm

-a group of words established by usage as having a meaning not deducible from those of the individual words (dictionary.com) Here’s 10 most useful idioms that you can use to almost every composition that you will see in PSLE.

  1. A penny for your thoughts: asking someone’s thoughts
  2. Best of both worlds: All advantages are in effect.
  3. Can’t judge a book by its cover: Cannot judge something/someone on appearance alone.
  4. Curiosity killed the cat: Being Inquisitive can lead you into an unpleasant situation.
  5. Don’t put all your eggs in one basket: Do not put all your resources in one possibility.
  6. Every cloud has a silver lining: Be optimistic, even difficult times will lead to better days.
  7. In the heat of the moment: Overwhelmed by what is happening in the moment.
  8. Kill two birds with one stone: To accomplish two different things at the same time.
  9. Let the cat out of the bag: To share information that was previously concealed
  10. Piece of cake: A job, task or other activity that is easy or simple.
eduKateSG Primary Students at Punggol
eduKateSG Primary Students at Punggol

EduKate Singapore PSLE English Composition Writing Materials-Types of Characters

Singapore PSLE English Language Syllabus Composition Writing Section-prepared by eduKate Tuition Centre

The following is a summarised class material for PSLE EL Syllabus under topic “types of character” that shall be used by eduKate for teaching PSLE candidates in their attempt of the PSLE EL Composition writing section.

Major Characters

Major characters are characters that appear sufficiently in the story to drive the story forwards. They are also characters that will let readers identify with and bond throughout the story.

Minor Characters

Minor characters are characters that appear in localised smaller parts of the story, and could add to driving the story, or not driving the story at all. Minor characters can be used to add to the richness of the story and provide a distraction or comic relief to the reader.

A person who never made a mistake never tried anything new.
Albert Einstein
eduKateSG Tuition Centre Primary Students at Prive Punggol Singapore
eduKateSG Tuition Centre Primary Students at Prive Punggol Singapore

Protagonist

A protagonist is the main character and driver of the story. It creates movement of the plot and engages the reader’s imagination and empathy. The protagonist usually has character traits that readers identify with and is usually the hero or heroine of the story. This is not always true, with protagonists that can be evil, or even neutral to make things interesting for ther reader.  The protagonist usually solves the conundrum in the story, or provides for a solution to the moral dilemma presented within the theme taken by the writer.

Antagonist

An antagonist is the counter character to the protagonist, creating friction and problems for the protagonist to negate. The antagonist is the other driver of the plot and, together with the antagonist, moves the plot to its conclusion. The antagonist presents a counter balance to the protagonist and could give a valuable insight for the reader into the protagonists character/actions/decisions. Again, the antagonist might be evil in nature, or could even be a hero in the story, which gives a twist to the general perception and again, makes things interesting for the reader.

Character Development

Dynamic Character

A dynamic character undergoes personality changes in the story plot, developing into another character or attaining a different outlook/experience. It usually takes a pivotal event in the plot where the character experiences monumental tasks and readjusts to cater for the change.

Static Character

A static character does not undergo any changes in the story. Usually static characters does not undergo any changes because throughout the story, a static character is hardly affected by climactic problems and soldiers on solving it.

eduKateSG Primary Students at Tampines
eduKateSG Primary Students at Tampines

Instrumental Characters

Round Characters

A round character is fully developed to be complex and realistic. Depth of character and attention to details makes round characters malleable to changes in the plot and readers sympathise with round characters easily through empathy. Round characters also mimic reality and gives readers an insight into the character and keeps the story interesting.

Flat Characters

The reverse of round characters, flat characters are not fully delineated and usually only has one or two traits to carry through the story. Usually not the main character in the story, flat characters are important tools used to provide comic relief, or even instrumental to a change in the plot.

Foil

A foil is a character that contrasts another main character to make readers appreciate the difference. The intention of the foil is to make readers understand the other character its “foiling” better.

Symbolic 

A symbolic character is a character that symbolises certain ideas or morals of society. The intention of symbolic characters are for readers to identify the hidden trademarks within the story and see its relevance to the theme of the story. It denotes clever writing and makes the reader appreciate its intelligence and its intrinsic fabrication by the writer.